Electric Guitar

  • Schecter Announces the Keith Merrow KM-6 Signature Model

    Schecter Guitar Research Keith Merrow KM-6 Signature ModelSchecter Guitar Research has just announced the addition of the new Keith Merrow KM-6 signature 6-string guitar. It will be showcased for the first time in a new edition of Schecter Guitars’ "Conquering Rifftopia" webisode IV on schecterguitars.com. Building on the massive success of the prior Keith Merrow 2014 Signature 7-string model, Schecter Guitar Research has decided to respond to the enormous popular demand by producing and releasing a new 6 string version of the much acclaimed KM-7.

    “The KM-7 turned out to be the perfect guitar for what I do. It just made sense that we also make it available as a 6-string," says Keith Merrow. The new KM-6 retains the same powerful tone and imposing yet simple looks that were popularized by its 7-string counterpart. This model also features the all new Blackened Black Winter pickups, made by Seymour Duncan exclusively for Schecter Guitars. Straightforward and to the point, with a hipshot 6-hard tail bridge, a single push-pull volume knob and a three-way toggle switch, the KM-6 needs nothing more to prove it is the ultimate shredding machine.

    Schecter Guitar Research, commonly known simply as Schecter, is an American guitar manufacturer. The company was founded in 1976 by David Schecter and originally produced only replacement parts for existing guitars from manufacturers such as Fender and Gibson. Today, the company mass-produces its own line of electric guitars, bass guitars, and steel-string acoustic guitars.

    Check out our entire selection of Schecter guitars!

  • BC Rich Introduces Six New Extended Range Guitars

    BC Rich Warlock Lucky 7 BC Rich Warlock Lucky 7

    No stranger to pushing the boundaries of guitar design, BC Rich created a collection of seven and eight string extended range electric guitars. All seven string guitars have a 25.5” scale length and the eight string models feature a 27" scale length for comfort and performance. All six models are now available worldwide in iconic Warlock, V and Villain body shapes.

    The Warlock Lucky 7 and Lucky 8 feature a mahogany body and bolt on neck with a 12" radius, rosewood fretboard, jumbo frets and an inline pointed headstock. Each guitar is finished with a high gloss black on the body and a fast black satin on the neck. A single ply, white binding around the fretboard completes the aesthetics. Two volume controls along with a master tone knob and 3-way toggle switch control the pair of Duncan Designed Blackout pickups, accented with black hardware and a fixed bridge.

    For guitarists with an eye for the more traditional, the Villain Escape 7 and Escape 8 features a basswood body and bolt on maple neck with a 16” radius, rosewood fretboard, pearl bones inlays, jumbo frets and an inline pointed headstock. Each guitar is finished in high gloss black with a single ply, white body binding. A single volume control combined with a master tone knob and 3-way toggle switch control the pair of B.D.S.M. humbucker pickups, accented with black hardware and a fixed bridge.

    The Jr. V Lucky 7 and Lucky 8 features a mahogany body and maple bolt on neck with a 12” radius, rosewood fretboard, jumbo frets and an inline pointed headstock. Each guitar is finished with a high gloss black on the body and a fast black satin on the neck. A single ply, white binding around the fretboard completes the aesthetics. A single master volume combined with a master tone knob and 3-way toggle switch control the pair of Duncan Designed Blackout pickups, accented with black hardware and a fixed bridge.

     

    Check out our entire selection of BC Rich guitars!

  • PRS Brushstroke 24 Electric Guitar

    PRS Brushstroke 24 PRS Brushstroke 24

    Based on Paul’s Guitar, the guitar that Paul Reed Smith is currently playing in the studio and on the stage, the Brushstroke 24 is lacking neither tone nor style. This limited edition model carries over a familiar carved, figured maple top with mahogany back wood combination, the unique “brushstroke” bird inlay design, and adds 24-fret, tremolo versatility to the Core Paul’s Guitar model.

    The pickups deliver a full range of tones from sweet, clean highs to full, alive mids and driven lows, and the electronics configuration consists of two narrow 408 pickups with a 3-way toggle switch. Two mini-toggle switches, situated between the volume and tone controls, allow players to move between humbucking and single coil tones with no volume loss when switching from full to single coils for maximum versatility.

    “The Brushstroke 24 is where visionary art and master craftsmanship meet,” said Jack Higginbotham, President of PRS Guitars. “This limited edition, with its elegant brushstroke bird inlay pattern and tonally versatile electronic package, is striking and performance ready regardless of whether the venue is a major concert arena or an intimate living room practice session.”

    Color options for this small batch run include some of PRS Guitars most popular maple top options: Aquableux, Black Gold, Blood Orange, Faded Whale Blue, Jade, Obsidian, Red Tiger, Violet.

     

    About PRS Guitars: If becoming the gold standard of quality in the guitar business was a remarkable achievement for PRS, equally impressive has been its maintaining that standard as the company has grown into a major industry presence. While PRS’s continuing success in this regard demands a constant re-evaluation of materials, tools, and procedures, the bottom-line goal hasn’t changed since the days when Paul Smith hand-crafted his first instruments in an upstairs loft: Build extraordinary guitars, guitars with magic.

    Check out our entire selection of PRS Guitars!

    For information on ordering and availability, shoot us a message at info@proaudioland.com or call us toll free at 1-877-671-2200!

     

  • Fender Announces New Models including Limited Edition American Standard Guitars

    New Fender Guitars American Standard Blacktop Classic From Top: Classic Player Baja Telecaster, Rascal Bass, Classic Player Strat HH and the Classic Player Triple Tele.

    Fender and ProAudioLand are proud to announce the release several new Limited Edition American Standard Series guitars, new Classic Player Series models and a Special Edition Blacktop Series guitar.

    The venerable American Standard Stratocaster now comes in a new limited edition model featuring Fender’s innovative channel-bound compound-radius fretboard and the time-honored look of a Dakota Red or Sonic Blue gloss finish. The fingerboard is inlaid into the neck in a design with an elegant appearance and a distinctive fretting-hand feel in which both edges are comfortably rounded, with no side seam between neck and fretboard. Further, the fingerboard’s 9.5"-14" compound radius graduates smoothly from a more rounded profile at the nut (great for chording) to a more flattened profile near the body (great for soloing).

     

    The workhorse American Standard Telecaster is also available as a new limited edition model featuring Fender’s innovative channel-bound compound-radius fingerboard and the time-honored look of a Dakota Red or Sonic Blue gloss finish.

     

    In addition, Fender introduces two brilliant new limited edition looks for the American Standard Stratocaster—Vintage White with a tortoiseshell pickguard and rosewood fingerboard, and Mystic Aztec Gold with a parchment pickguard and maple fingerboard. All the acclaimed features, sound and style of the archetypal American Standard Stratocaster, now in even more beautiful finish options.

     

    Former Fender Custom Shop Master Builder Chris Fleming has taken his previous design for the Classic Player Baja Telecaster and upgraded it with full-on 1960s features and vibe, including a rosewood fingerboard and a comfortable ’60s “C”-shaped neck profile. The guitar also features an alder body, 9.5" fingerboard radius and 21 medium jumbo frets, single coil American Vintage ’52 Tele (neck) and ’58 Tele (bridge) pickups with special four-way (including both pickups in series) and S-1™ switching, three-ply pickguard, American Vintage string-through body Telecaster bridge with three brass “barrel” saddles, special Custom Shop neck plate engraving and more.

     

    Fender Custom Shop Master Builder Yuriy Shishkov has designed an entirely new model for the Classic Player series that blends ’60s and ’70s styling with modern high-performance. The Classic Player Strat HH has special touches including dual Wide Range Special humbucking pickups, five-way switching with coil splitting for more traditional single-coil Stratocaster sounds, and a sultry Dark Mercedes Blue gloss finish with a matching headstock. Other features include a maple neck with a comfortable ’60s “C”-shaped profile, bound rosewood fingerboard with 9.5" radius and 22 medium jumbo frets, three-ply black pickguard, two-point synchronized tremolo bridge with modern plate and vintage-style saddles, and vintage-style Fender “F”-stamped tuners.

     

    New Fender Guitars American Standard Blacktop Classic From Top: LE American Standard Stratocaster Channel Bound Dakota Red, LE American Standard Stratocaster Mystic Aztec Gold, LE American Standard Stratocaster Vintage White, LR American Standard Telecaster Channel Bound Sonic Blue and the Special Edition Blacktop Jazzmaster HH.

    Fender Custom Shop Master Builder Todd Krause has designed an unusual take on the Telecaster for the Classic Player series. The high-performance Classic Player Triple Tele rocks three slanted Nocaster single-coil bridge pickups for truly distinctive modern tone and the classic look of a black finish and pickguard paired with a one-piece maple neck/fingerboard. Other features include a thick “C”-shaped neck profile, 9.5” fingerboard radius and 21 vintage-style frets, five-way Stratocaster-style switching, vintage-style string-through-body bridge with three brass saddles, special Custom Shop neck plate engraving and more.

     

    Originally created in the Fender Custom Shop by Master Builder Jason Smith, the Rascal Bass joins the Fender lineup as a sleek short-scale Classic Player model loaded with distinctive features and personality. With its ’60s-era Bass VI body, three Seymour Duncan lipstick Stratocaster pickups, 30” scale and gorgeous gloss Ocean Turquoise finish with matching Coronado-style headstock, there’s no other Fender bass like the Rascal. Other premium features include a flat-sawn maple neck with a comfortable “C”-shaped profile, 9.5”-radius rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium jumbo frets and special inlay scheme (bass-side dot markers from 3rd to 9th frets, double dots at 12th fret, treble-side dot markers from 15th to 21st frets), vintage-style heel-end truss rod adjustment, white pearloid pickguard, five-way pickup switch with chrome “barrel” tip, push-pull master volume control that delivers seven pickup configurations, master tone control, distinctive bridge with four adjustable steel “barrel” saddles, vintage-style tuners and more.

     

    The Blacktop Jazzmaster is now available in a scorching special edition HH model with dual humbucking pickups for even more supercharged tone. Further, a new all-black look features a Candy Apple Red racing stripe that takes a sleek cue from the great “competition stripe” Fender models of the late ’60s and early ’70s.

     

     

    For information on ordering and availability, shoot us a message at info@proaudioland.com or call us toll free at 1-877-671-2200!

    Check out our entire selection of Fender guitar and basses!

  • Guitar Wood: All About Alder

    One of the first thing you’ll notice when it comes to electric guitar bodies is that they come in two main flavors: Ash and Alder. Why are ash and alder such popular choices? Where do they come from? Is one better than the other?  Yesterday we took a look at Ash so today, let’s move on to Alder.

     

    Alder

    As mentioned in yesterday’s article, up until mid 1956, Fender used ash on most of their bodies but from then until now, alder has become the wood of choice. The reason for this wasn’t because of some scientific discovery of the tonal properties of alder. No, the reason for this was much simpler – it was more readily available and affordable. It’s not on a favorite of Fender’s but of a great bulk of guitar manufacturers today!

    Alder is the common name of a genus of flowering plants (Alnus) belonging to the birch family Betulaceae. The genus comprises about 30 species of monoecious trees and shrubs, a few reaching a large size, distributed throughout the North Temperate Zone – down south from the Tropic of Cancer all the way to the Arctic Circle. Most of the variety of alder falls into two main types: Alnus glutinosa, also known as black alder or European alder and native to most of Europe and to Southwest Asia; and Alnus rubra, or red alder, which is native to the U.S. West Coast.

    alder trees Alder trees by the Beaulieu River at Longwater Lawn in Southern England

    As you might guess, red alder is the one used for guitars in general and Fender guitars in particular. Since it grows from Southeast Alaska to Central California and almost always within 125 miles of the Pacific Coast, a plentiful and affordable supply existed practically in Fender’s backyard.

    Of the 30 or so alder tree varieties, guitar-friendly red alder ranks among the world’s largest, reaching heights up to 100 feet. It is a fast-growing hardwood, albeit one of the softer ones, and it’s also used for furniture and cabinetry. Instrument bodies made of red alder typically consist of two to four pieces glued together.

    Red alder boasts many sonic advantages. Not especially dense, it’s a lightweight, closed-pore wood (unlike ash) that has a resonant, balanced tone brighter than other hardwoods, with a little more emphasis in the upper midrange. It imparts excellent sustain and sharp attack. It’s very easy to work with and it glues well. Notably, alder also takes finishes well—with a light brown color and a tight grain that’s only slightly visible, it’s ideal for solid colors rather than the transparent finishes that look so good on ash.

    Fender has used other electric instrument body woods at various points in its history. A small number of instruments with mahogany bodies were made in 1963 and 1964, and several mahogany-body instruments are made today. Many Japanese-made Fender instruments of the 1980s and ’90s had basswood bodies, but only very few models are made of basswood today. Other woods in use today on a very small number of Fender electric instruments include poplar, pine and koto.

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